Part 1

In Part 1 of the Speaking Paper you will be asked questions about yourself.

• This part takes about three minutes.

• The examiner talks to each candidate in turn.

• You don’t need to talk to the other candidate. but you can do so if you want to.

• The questions in this part of the interview usually cover areas such as your family. home town. work or study. leisure and your future plans.

family1.jpg

Questions

Do you have a job or are you still a student?

What kind of work do the majority of people in your town do?

What job do you hope to do in the future?

What do you usually do during your holidays?

Which member of your family are you closest to?

What part of the world would you especially like to visit, and why?

Could you tell me something about the town you live in?

What are your plans for the next few years?

What do you like best about your studies?

Do you come from a large family or a small one?

Do you have any brothers or sisters or are you an only child?

Are the members in your family close to each other?

Which member of your family do you have the closest relationship with? Why?

Do you enjoy talking to older members of your family? Why (not)?

Do all the members of your family live near one another?

Do any members of your family live far away/abroad?

Do you prefer to spend your free time with your family or with your friends?

What do you most enjoy doing with your friends?

In your opinion. what makes a good friend?

family2.jpg

Practice 2: Strategy building

Look at these extracts from three FCE interviews (Part 1: Personal questions). The candidates’ answers are grammatically correct, but they are not appropriate. What is wrong with each answer? Choose from the responses:

a It is not detailed enough.
b It is not well-organised.
c It sounds negative and rather rude.
d It is not relevant to the question.

Interviewer: ‘Can you tell me something about your family’?
Candidate: ‘I suppose so.’

2 Interviewer: ‘Can you tell me something about your family?’
Candidate: ‘Yes. It’s a small one.’

3 Interviewer: ‘Can you tell me something about your family?’
Candidate: ‘Yes. I live in a flat in the centre of the town. It’s quite big. so I have my own bedroom, but my two sisters have to share a room.’

4 Interviewer: ‘Can you tell me something about your family?’
Candidate: ‘Certainly. My father’s name is Pavlos, my mother is called Dimitra and my older brother is Stelios. My father is forty years old. My father is a teacher. My mother is thirty-seven. Stelios is at university he’s studying law. He’s nineteen. My mother works in a bank.’

family3.jpg
Useful words and phrases

rivalry
jealous/jealousy
lonely/loneliness
a good sense of humour
spoilt
self-sufficient
strict
to have a row
to share your parents’ attention
to compete with
to have a good laugh
to be good company
to tease to trust someone
to rely on someone
to make fun of
to have fun to have interests in common
to be overprotective of someone

family4.jpg

1 What is important to you in a friend?

2 What are the advantages and disadvantages of being an only child?

3 What problems sometimes occur between members of the same family?

Student 1: You are the examiner. Ask the candidate questions. You can choose qnestions from the list below and add some of your own if you want. Try to make each question lead on naturally from the candidate’s answers. Keep the candidate speaking for a total of one and a half minutes.

Student 2: You are the candidate. Answer the examiner’s questions. Use vocabulary from the Useful uiords and phrases box to help you if necessary, and remember the tips about strategy.

Student 3: You are an assessor. Listen to the candidate and make a note of good points, and points for improvement in his/her use of grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation.

Student 4: You are another assessor. Listen to the candidate and make a note of good points, and points for improvement concerning the length, organisation and relevance of his/her answers.

Possible questions

• Can you tell me something about your family?

• Do you have a large family or a small family?

• What are the advantages and disadvantages of being an only child?

• What problems sometimes occur between members of the same family?

• What is important to you in a friend?

Click here to listen to an example of part 1

You may click here if you want to listen to another example of part 1

OK, maybe you want to listen to another example. Try this link

Listen to an examiner asking you Part 1 questions and try to answer them. To do this you need to click here

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: